Contents/Links:
Electromagnetic Compatibility

    Electromagnetic Compatibility or EMC is the ability for electronic or electrical systems to function in its designed electromagnetic environment without damage or deterioration in function. This large category of phenomena occur for a variety of reasons under a diverse set on conditions. For engineers designing electrical systems and products it is crucial that their product continue to function, or show immunity, to these types of electrical occurrences. A common example of immunity is Electrostatic Discharge, or ESD. This event occurs when buildup of voltage occurs and is released onto another object or person that has a potentially different voltage. This can be thought of in the real world example of build up of voltage on a person as they walk across a carpet and touch a metal object. Immunity testing in this example would need to occur on the metal object should it be connected to an electrical system. The focus on emissions, as the term implies, is what is being discharge either through air or materials.Electromagnetic Compatibility EMC Diagram comparing immunity & emissions

    Both radiated and conducted means of transfer apply to both emissions and immunity. Looking at the picture above demonstrates that radiated refers to the transfer via the air and conducted being physically connected. All of these means of transfer have standards associated with them limiting and requiring equipment to meet different specifications. The most common type of EMC Immunity testing done is commercial based testing to the International Electrotehnical Commission or IEC.

    EN / IEC Series

    ANSI / IEEE Series

    When taking into consideration production of an electronic or electrical system it is crucial to consider EMC during all phases of product development cycle. Once a product is identified as having to meet a specific standard then the proper modifications can be put in place prior to production. A major factor in considering which standards apply to particular product is where and how the product is being used. There are a variety of different applications beyond the more commercial based standards including Military/Avionic, Automotive, and many others. These standards are tested to by third party testing labs providing a certification that a product does meet the required specifications. Should a product failure to meet a necessary standard then modifications must be made and the product be resubmitted.

    Contents/Links: Electromagnetic Compatibility

      Electromagnetic Compatibility or EMC is the ability for electronic or electrical systems to function in its designed electromagnetic environment without damage or deterioration in function. This large category of phenomena occur for a variety of reasons under a diverse set on conditions. For engineers designing electrical systems and products it is crucial that their product continue to function, or show immunity, to these types of electrical occurrences. A common example of immunity is Electrostatic Discharge, or ESD. This event occurs when buildup of voltage occurs and is released onto another object or person that has a potentially different voltage. This can be thought of in the real world example of build up of voltage on a person as they walk across a carpet and touch a metal object. Immunity testing in this example would need to occur on the metal object should it be connected to an electrical system. The focus on emissions, as the term implies, is what is being discharge either through air or materials.Electromagnetic Compatibility EMC Diagram comparing immunity & emissions

      Both radiated and conducted means of transfer apply to both emissions and immunity. Looking at the picture above demonstrates that radiated refers to the transfer via the air and conducted being physically connected. All of these means of transfer have standards associated with them limiting and requiring equipment to meet different specifications. The most common type of EMC Immunity testing done is commercial based testing to the International Electrotehnical Commission or IEC.

      EN / IEC Series

      ANSI / IEEE Series

      When taking into consideration production of an electronic or electrical system it is crucial to consider EMC during all phases of product development cycle. Once a product is identified as having to meet a specific standard then the proper modifications can be put in place prior to production. A major factor in considering which standards apply to particular product is where and how the product is being used. There are a variety of different applications beyond the more commercial based standards including Military/Avionic, Automotive, and many others. These standards are tested to by third party testing labs providing a certification that a product does meet the required specifications. Should a product failure to meet a necessary standard then modifications must be made and the product be resubmitted.

      All Things EMC - Electromagnetic Compatibility Basics

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